#2029 A bit of everything Sunday

It was about 5pm today when I realised I felt… different.

This was a novel way for me to feel on a Sunday afternoon.

I felt happy. Content and even a bit excited about the week ahead.

WHY?

I am always dealing with massive Monday-itis feelings come Sunday afternoon, yes even in lockdown. It’s the start of more routine, more work, more home-schooling, and after having spent the day with Hubbie and baby girl, it just really makes me sad that we won’t all be together the next day.

So why was I happy?

Well, I think it was a bit of everything.

Father’s Day, of course. Showering Hubbie with cards and surprise gifts this morning.

Having video calls with family, which really put a smile on my dial. Seeing my Dad and Mum, and sis and bro-in-law made me feel happy and connected to them despite the distance between us in lockdown.

Then I made this new soup recipe, a chicken, vegetable and pasta soup, and it was really yum! So I was stewing over that (almost literally) ’til lunchtime.

And then I wrote up a new weekly timetable for myself, because I often find myself so busy but really scattered, because I don’t know what to do first when I have free time, and end up fluffing around. This way, knowing what day I will focus on what will give me tremendous drive and clarity as to what to do, when. It already worked, today was my clear clutter day, and I was totally killing it. 🀣

So yeah. I am happy, and I don’t have any massive reason why, they’re all little reasons…

(All together now…)

But the little things, ARE the big things. πŸ’–πŸ˜πŸ₯°πŸ’–

#2026 Just, slowly

It was still sunny when I finished work today, so baby girl and I went for a walk around the block.

Observing flowers, picking an extra one here, there… adjusting the free lemons sign from a neighbour that had blown down the street.

Looking at dogs. Commenting on a young girl’s skateboarding skills.

Squinting into the sun. Watching the black crow cross our path.

And at the end of our trip, it came out of her so naturally. I had picked up pace as we neared home, and she said –

“Samo polako.”

A phrase we’ve repeated heaps, not just because of my Croatian background, but because my Mum says it all the time. And I guess we repeat the words of those we love, we think of them, of what we would be doing if we could see them, and what we could say, because at the moment, we just can’t.

It means “just, slowly.” It was worded so perfectly, coined at just the right time.

I had to laugh.

Kind of a good motto for life too, don’t you think?

Photo by Aaron Burden on Pexels.com

#1987 The multicultural writing workshop

I was meant to attend this multicultural workshop today in person, but alas, COVID.

It had been rescheduled many times, and by the time today came I think the organisers felt we could all wait no more.

Put it online.

I had my tea ready, my writing tools, position by the window… check. βœ”

We explored using a language other than English within our writing: whether that be a language we’ve lived with at home, a language we’ve inherited, or a language we’ve learned from living in another place. We experimented with techniques and read poetic examples of other writers who have dabbled in this method of the multilingual writer.

We had a couple of writing exercises too, and I wanted to share one of those with you. In exploring language, and what another language meant to us, and how it defined us… my memory led me to a perfect example.

My childhood example:

“My childhood can’t pinpoint the part at which I learnt to speak English or my ancestral tongue. They are both blended and merged, swirled together in a kaleidoscope of colours; mixed together like the Croatian walnut roll, β€˜orehnjaca’ my Mum made. The walnut filling was a distinct layer, separate from the dough, and yet you couldn’t have one without the other. It was perfect as a whole.

Old footage has me at my third birthday, my mum and godmother encouraging me to repeat the words β€œspider, yuck” after someone had used a rubber spider to scare my arachnophobe sister, consequently scaring me too in the process. I repeated these words to the camera, my childlike voice coming out clearly tinged with the European dialect I was accustomed to.

In the next breath my godmother was laughing about my fear of β€œdebeli kum” and she and my Mum broke up in unrestrained laughter. Spoken so I didn’t understand, but I knew precisely what they were saying – my β€œfat godfather” as they had coined him, who I was petrified of, perhaps not so much for his size, but for his warped German accent when he spoke Croatian, and his loud bellowing β€œmwa ha ha ha” laugh as he joined in on their laughter and teasing.”

Thanks for reading. πŸ™

#1957 Remembering him, and the memories

A part of me feels like I’m not allowed to write about my uncle, because I had only spent two periods of my life with him.

But today, having learned of his passing, I feel a tremendous amount of sadness for my Mum’s family, while also realising that I am more than qualified to speak about him, because he inhabited some of the most meaningful and memorable parts of my life.

When I was 13 I travelled with my parents overseas. Being a fresh teenager, the thought of meeting family that I hadn’t met before was not exactly thrilling stuff.

And yet those 3 months ended up being the best of my life.

Our home base was at my uncle and aunty’s house, and so we would return there often for days at a time, sometimes weeks, in between our travels around Croatia and the neighbouring countries where our relatives lived.

I remember how much he and my Dad seemed to click. Both fond of drinking the hard stuff at 40%, they loved their grapes, their gardens, and their gadgets. Both natural handymen. It was never too early to ‘cheers,’ and they were often caught having a good ol’ chat.

I remember the garden, the vines above providing ample cover as good as a ceiling. I remember the swing there too, and the kittens that crawled along the roof of these vines, and how I looked up at them.

I remember the ‘bunker’ at the bottom of the house, and I remember the random spa-type apparatus that sat on top of the garage! Me and one of my cousins sat in the empty pool as it were, on a hot Summer’s day.

I remember them taking us out to ice cream in the main centre. I remember us walking the streets, and them telling us where the bombs had fallen, showing us the concrete scars they had left on the road. They showed us where their son had gone to high school and proudly pointed out the court he played basketball in.

I remember more vividly the second time I visited my uncle and aunty, because it was more recent… it was when Hubbie and I were on our honeymoon.

Although it wasn’t yesterday, the memories are far fresher. I had the opportunity to spend time with them, now as an adult, out of the wings of my parents, 12 years on. Hubbie and I sat with them. There was still the bunker, the 40% alcohol, and the cherished garden. And of course, the cats.

I think he had a soft spot for cats.

On the few days we were in town, he kindly played tourist guide, driving us around to see other family members. We saw his favourite fishing hole, and he spoke fondly of his own family, and of his memories with them.

I often found myself staring at him and being amazed at the likeness between him and his son.

But what I remember most, is the day he took us to the train station, as we set to depart from Croatia.

We waved goodbye, and I said we would see him again one day. I watched as he turned, his head bobbing down in a sign of resignation as he walked away.

But that day never came.

I think of all of this, and I send so much love out to my family tonight.

I hope they too hold their own special memories of him that they’re replaying in their minds.

It’s just another sombre reminder that we must grasp each and every day with all our might and all our love.

Photo by Rahul on Pexels.com

RIP, M.G.

#1910 Mother’s Beach Day

How was today made special for me?

Well, I got little school gifts purchased from the Mother’s Day stall last week.

I didn’t have to do the grocery shopping (praise the Lord!)

AND… I relaxed by the bay.

😍😍

We did everything by the water today. We ate near it, bringing ourselves some food and bubbly…

We went to the park.

We got coffees and drank them on the sand.

And we just lay there, doing NOTHING as baby girl made sandcastles nearby.

NOTHING. Ahhh.

And we were at, get ready for it… Mother’s Beach.

Talk about appropriate. πŸ’–πŸ’–

Happy Mothers Day for ALL the Mums today.

For the old Mums, and the young Mums.

For the angel Mums with wings.

For the Mums with angel babies.

For the ‘should-be’ Mums.

For the adoptive Mums.

For the step-Mums.

For the fur baby Mums.

For the trying Mums.

For the solo Mums.

I see you. I hear you. I feel you. πŸ’–πŸ’–

#1836 Brief visit, and the tick of approval

Today my Mum and my sister swung by very briefly.

It was so good to see them, even though the time was limited.

As they headed home I sent with them my home-made plum dumplings, and hours later got a call from Mum…

She was in approval. My knedle, were good!

You know, no matter how old you are, approval from your parents is still so important.

And Mum approves of the dumplings.

YES!

#1832 A foot for both families

Today was an exciting day in that we made NEW memories.

We went to my parents new house… and we were ALL together for the first time.

YAY! Happy dance.

As I walked the path between my parents’ house, and my sister’s house, along this cute, tiled path that crossed the fence line, I couldn’t help but think of that The Simpsons episode…

The one called ‘Bart versus Australia,’ where Homer learns that the American embassy, even if located in Australia, is still considered American soil… and so he does this:

It’s a funny memory that has stayed with me since I was a kid. Well I did my own Homer today…

One foot in sister’s territory… and one foot in my parents’ territory!

Parents’ house.

Sister’s house.

Parents’ house.

Sister’s house.

This is going to be FUN! πŸ€£πŸ‘πŸ’–πŸ˜

#1824 Goodbye number 14

Phwoar. What a day.

Today was the day that we said goodbye to our family home.

The home that my parents have lived in for 40 years.

The home that my sister spent growing up as a teenager, all the way until she got married.

The home that’s the only childhood, family home I’ve ever known… that I lived in for 25 years until I got married.

Goodbye, number 14.

It was an emotionally bittersweet day. Emotional because oh God, all of the above! So many memories are in every inch, every corner, every crevice of that house.

Through the rush to get everything out of the house this morning, I tried to pause every so often, look around, take a breath, and say a personal thanks to the house that made my years growing up, the best in the world.

Here is the emotional part.

I was reflecting on my life spent there as I walked around the empty rooms, a bit taken aback by the hollowness of it all. The furniture, furnishings, and all the photos and trinkets that made it such a loved home, were all gone.

But oh, those walls. If those walls could talk.

Those walls would speak of happiness, of laughter. Of sadness and shock, family coming together, and family celebrating to make the most out of life.

And love. SO much love.

Memories hit me as I walked into rooms, turned corners. Looked this way, that. People from the past resurfaced, along with people from the present.

In the lounge room, I saw myself sitting on the floor while my parents watched footy on the TV.

In the kitchen I saw my Mum cooking up a feast, our family sitting down to eat at the small round table, perfect for us in size, so perfect, to keep us tight and close together, as always.

In the garden I saw happiness. Friends, cousins, brimming around, enjoying a drink on a hot Summer’s day, folk music from the garage wafting over and adding to the festive atmosphere of it all.

The garage, ohhhh, the garage. Where so, so, so many parties and events were had. Birthdays. Milestones. Weddings. Day after weddings! New Years. And all of the Christmases that Mum cooked up a storm, catering for over 30 people like it was an absolute breeze, even though it wasn’t.

She made it look effortless.

Those were the days. Those were the BEST days.

The park next door. Hearing the squeals of happiness from our younger cousins as they took advantage of the play proximity.

At the front door, I saw my sister being led out in her wedding dress by my parents… then I saw myself, doing the same.

Deep breath.

The dining room showed me all of us, our big family, as we are now. The original foursome, us, being my parents, sister and I, but now with our Hubbies and our kids, filling up the table, eating heaps, drinking more, and playing music off of youtube on the mobile until the late hours of the night.

In my bedroom. The bedroom that I spent 15 years of my life sleeping, dreaming and hoping in. I had another room for the first 10 years of my life, but I claimed this one, sister’s one, after she got married and moved out.

It’s always been the better room.

I sat in my old room. Took some photos around me. And then here, I began to cry.

I remember watching Video Hits for hours on weekend mornings.

My childhood cat scratching at my window, wanting to be let in, and then me opening the window to shoo her, upset she had woken me… but when she jumped down from the window sill outside, I thought stuff it, you’ve woken me now… and so I would call her back in (she must have thought I was a crazy bipolar cat owner) and she’d snuggle up next to me as I slept a little more.

I’d open up that window, and talk to friends through it.

I talked to SO MANY people, through it.

I listened to music for hours on my bed.

I had sleepovers in that room.

I had sleepovers in that house! On the lounge room floor, covered in blankets and sleeping bags.

When Croatia played Australia in the 2006 World Cup, Hubbie-then-boyfriend and I watched it, me running around the house with a Cro flag when Croatia scored a goal, and Hubbie running around the house with an Aussie flag when they scored a goal.

I don’t remember who won that game. All I remember is the memories.

All the people who came, and went from that house. It would be in the hundreds. Friends, family, people who I grew up with, grew apart from, so many people have touched base in that house, shared a laugh, a dance, a drink, and made a memory.

Even baby girl. It was the first place that she ever visited, after her own home.

Speaking of baby girl… My waters broke in that house! And my own Mum’s waters broke in there, when she was pregnant with me!

Both sister’s Hubbie, and my Hubbie, met my parents for the first time in THAT lounge room…

News broke. Secrets shared. Heavy discussions were had. Tears shed.

People were welcomed. People were greeted.

People came in, and immediately knew that there was love. They were safe. They were in a memorable place.

And so today, the time came. We walked through the house. We took our final photos.

And we drove off, for good.

That was seriously bitter, right?

Where is the sweet?

Well, it comes with the choice. How blessed are we that this was born of my parents decision to move closer to me and sis, and not because of a bad circumstance.

How lucky are we that we get to say goodbye, together, in the best way possible… and how lucky that we still get to take ALL the memories with us?

Including most importantly, the people.

I am so looking forward to making just as many happy memories in their new abode. 🏑🏑

But my heart will always hold a very special and dear place, for number 14.

πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–

#1818 Underneath it all, my happy place

Today I found myself really happy, in a place that I never really thought much of before.

Under the house.

Under, my parents house.

That’s baby girl way back there, climbing further and further underneath.

But at the beginning, we were scaredy cats. All of us, except for Dad. Of course he wasn’t scared, he made that storage space what it is today.

Mum got the guts first. Again, of course. She went in, and was slowly looking around, pulling things out, and discovering hidden treasures…

44 year old hidden treasures. Guess what it was…

🍢

I called baby girl out, because hey, check this out! She had never been under there, and seeing as it was the last time at my parents house for her, well there was honestly NO BETTER TIME.

And then it just kinda happened.

It occurred to me, that this was part of my childhood. I remembered going underneath there with my Dad, as a kid, back when I wasn’t so freaked out by spiders and webs… and as I grew, so too did my fascination of the place go dimmer.

I mean, why would I want to go under there? In the dust, bugs threatening to drop, strings of webs stuck to my hair?

I crouched outside the door there today, deciding “I AM GOING UNDER!” I knew the smell that would hit me before I even went in, and I wanted to sit in it, one last time.

As soon as baby girl realised I was headed in, she was off like a rocket, after her Baka. I slowly followed, and once my Dad was in there, soon all four of us were on hands and knees, looking around, me shining my phone torchlight towards them so they could see where they were headed.

As they set off in different directions, I sat, looking around. Those old wine bottles. Bags of old Christmas decorations. Paint tubs. An old crib. Tents. Sleeping bags. Spirits. 100 different planks of wood.

The smell of wine barrels, dust, and something else astringent filled my nostrils.

The air was cool and comforting. Yet something musty surrounded us, the smells of yesteryear hanging low there, reminding us that they would never float away, no matter how long that door remained open.

It was the scent of memories.

That’s what it was. Memories. I may never smell that scent again, but I will never forget it.

#1685 Day 187 of getting there: video calls

I think we’re all so grateful for video calls right now.

I see my work mates over zoom, every shift at midday. Like today. We play games, there are laughs, but most of all there is connection.

And I don’t mean the technological kind.

I had that work zoom chat today… then Mum called me in the afternoon… via video chat!

Her face when she saw me, then I turned it on baby girl…

Priceless. 😍

And tonight. The regular Friday night friends catch-up.

I don’t know where I would be without these video calls. No matter who it is, I am staying connected with everyone, and it is my saviour. πŸ™

Photo by Ekaterina Bolovtsova on Pexels.com